Drawing Key Signatures

Simple Sharps and Fearless Flats

Simple Sharps and Fearless Flats, the worksheets that I made several years ago, are great to help students who are having trouble writing key signatures. Sometimes students are confused or have trouble putting the accidentals on the correct line or space.  Last year I changed some of the graphics in my old versions  for a cleaner, more updated look, and I am just now posting them.

I laminate these and use them as helpful posters when I am showing how to write key signatures.  They can also be printed and put in the  student’s binder for reference. The blank staff at the bottom can be used for practice. If you print multiple copies, try using the “fast” or “economy” setting to save ink. I do that and they look fine, just not as vibrant.

The large staves and spaced apart sharps and flats really do make writing key signatures simple and fearless, especially if I use them with 2 other helpful posters on a giant staff, Down a Fourth and Up a Fourth. Many students have told me they didn’t understand how to write key signatures until we used Simple Sharps and Fearless Flats. With fall testing coming around, I hope they will be useful.

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2 thoughts to “Simple Sharps and Fearless Flats Revised

  • Joanne

    Dear Susan,

    This summer at a workshop, I picked up a ittle tidbit that has helped my students learn key signatures. It’s the number ‘7’. The flats and sharps of a letter add up to seven. For example: C has all or nothing. C Major has no sharps or flats. C flat has 7 flats, and C sharp has 7 sharps.

    Similarily, G has 1 sharp, G flat has six flats = 7
    D has 2 sharps, D flat has five flats = 7

    If they know one, it helps them learn the other. Quite clever.

    Your worksheets are always useful and so well done. Thank you.

    • susanparadis

      Thanks, Joanne, for sharing this helpful tip!

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