Tag Archives: learning note names

2018 One Minute Club Cards

One Minute Club Cards 2018 One Minute Club 2018

I’ve finished the 2018 One Minute Club cards. This is the time of year everyone starts to ask for them!

Sometimes, as teachers, parents, and students, we don’t realize that it is not enough to be able to identify note names on a flash card. Pianists need to know exactly where on the piano keyboard the note is found. And we need to be able to find it quickly, so that when hands have to jump from one octave to another, we will know exactly where to go.

In the One Minute Club, the idea is to show students flash cards and they “say and play” the notes on the grand staff in one minute or less.

Our job as teachers is to prepare students to learn how to do this. We can’t just present the cards one day and hope for the best. My students have been studying notes all year, and this is the culmination of all that work. And if we want students to be engaged, we have to find ways to make it accessible. For example, I start with just a few cards and, until they are successful, I don’t add more. And you have to keep it light-hearted and fun.

I’ve found students need to be in about 5th grade to have the motor skills for this, but you certainly need to start gradually preparing them before that. And then, sometimes students have excellent motor sills and visual memory so they can be successful much younger. Sadly, this activity will not turn a poor sight-reader into an excellent sight-reader, but it will help.

For students who struggle to learn note names, it’s better to wait until they are older, and then to gradually work up to this.

You are the teacher, so you get to decide how many and which cards the students should be able to say and play. There are no national standards, LOL!

Here is a link to a video I made to show you how it works.

There are 10 cards on the page. It is formatted for “business card” perforated cardstock, but you can also cut them out. I put them in plastic business card holders and attach them to their music bags. There is a slight over-lap (called “bleed”) with the border to help with printing on business card stock, so if you cut them out yourself, be award of that. Draw a cutting line on the cards with a ruler, don’t just cut out along the blue or the card will be too big.

You might notice the design is the same theme I used for the calendar at the beginning of the year. My students look forward to new art each year! [Edited to add challenge chart.] Here is a challenge chart I posted a few months back you can use to keep track of your students progress. One is even fillable! Challenge Charts

You can read more about how to run this activity on my blog at this link. One Minute Club

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Filed under Note Identification, Teaching Aids, Theory

Robot Wars: Notes on the Treble Clef Worksheet

Robot Wars Treble Notes

Droid Wars Treble Notes is the fourth in a series using my droid theme. Today’s post is the partner with the Droid Wars: Bass Clef Notes I posted earlier in the week. This is a new, free worksheet that will help students identify notes quickly. Print one copy and  laminate it or put it in a sheet protector. Use a wet erase marking pen and you will be able to use one page many times and save on printing. Wet erase pens are not too messy if you use a damp paper towel, and they erase much better than dry erase markers. You can also save these to your iPad.

Some of my younger students don’t know what a droid is. Well, in science fiction, it is short for Android, which is a robot. From what I gather, they are not ordinary robots, but a sentient robots like R2D2 in Star Wars. I’m always telling my students not to play like a robot, so Androids are not going to be performing in Carnegie Hall any time soon!

Remember, many of your girl students love Star Wars, so don’t leave them out!  I hope that these fun sheets will appeal to your girl as well as boy students.

I plan to add more to this series, so if you have any ideas, pass them on and I will see what I can do. Chord and inversions have already been suggested, but if you have any other ideas, feel free to leave a comment.

If you are a new follower of  Piano Teaching Resources, here are the links to the bass notes and the key signature worksheets. Our goal is to make lessons more fun so that more students will get the benefits of learning to play piano!

 

Robot Wars Bass Notes

Droid Key Signatures

Robot Key Signatures

 

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Filed under Theory, Worksheets

2017 One Minute Club Cards

One Minute Club 2017

One_Minute_Club_2017

I’ve finished the 2017 One Minute Club cards. In the file there is also a chart to keep track of your students’ times, and a certificate that a lot of teachers request.

If you are not sure how to use this activity works, the idea is you show students flash cards and they “say and play” the notes on the grand staff in one minute or less.

Playing the correct key on the piano is important, because as you know, students can learn notes on flash cards and remain clueless when it comes to knowing the correct placement on the piano. This solves that problem.

However, we have to prepare students to learn how to do this. We can’t just present the cards one day and hope for the best. My students have been studying notes all year, and this is the culmination of all that work.

Also, you have to keep it light-hearted and fun. That is why this activity is better with older students who have developed fine motor skills and already have a good grasp of note names.

For students who struggle to learn note names, it’s better to wait until they are older, and then to gradually work up to this. I usually start with 2 flash cards. After they can do that, I start gradually adding more, but never so many that they are overwhelmed. They may need to wait a few years before they actually do the entire grand staff. However, I also included “Junior One Minute Club” cards if you want to reward your students who can’t manage to say and play them in a minute.

Here is a link to a video I made to show you how it works.

The cards, chart, and certificate are in the same PDF file. You will need to know how to print individual pages in a PDF. I print only the chart first to keep a record of students’ times. Later, you can print the number of cards and certificates you need.

There are 10 cards on the first page. It is formatted for “business card” perforated cardstock, but you can also cut them out. I put them in plastic business card holders and attach them to their music bags.

You might notice the design is the same orange-colored theme I used for the calendar at the beginning of the year. My students look forward to new art each year.

You can read more about how to run this activity on my blog at this link. One Minute Club

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Filed under Certificates, Intermediate Students, Note Identification

Valentine Activities

It’s not too late to play a Valentine music game or play some Valentine music.  All of the material in this post are listed here on my page of free Valentine activities.

If you have middle or high school group lessons or a Valentine’s Day party, try this really fun Valentine game, Steal A Heart. I remade it a few years ago so that it is ink friendly. My teens love this game. Ledger line notes are included, but you don’t have to use them.

Valentine Board Game

Valentine Card Rhythm Hunt is a fast game you can play with beginners who are learning rhythm. I’ve made this game for every holiday, so if you don’t get to play it now, check out the other versions.

Valentine Card Rhythm Hunt

There is a 4 page (folded) Valentine’s card with a note story and a sudoku rhythm game. This makes a nice card to give students the week of February 14.

If you want to see more Valentine music activities, check out my Valentine page! There are links to some Valentine music, too.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Intermediate Students, Valentine's Day