We Wish You a Merry Christmas Pre-reading

We Wish You a Merry Christmas Pre-reading

There is a reason We Wish You A Merry Christmas is not found in pre-reading Christmas books very often. First, there is a pick up note, but most students ignore that. A bigger problem is the 8th notes. I could have written this in 6/4 time, and I have done that before for my students. So I am going to insert a poll. If you use pre-reading music with your students, do you think I should revise this and change all the quarters to half notes and all the eighth notes to quarters? In the meantime, I’m not going to count this, or explain the value of 8th notes. I’m not going to get out my hearts and teach two sounds on the beat at this point in their lessons. I’m just going to teach the 8ths by rote.  Since my students learn eights as “ti-ti” in school, I’ll start there, then tap the words in rhythm on the fall board, play in the air, jump up and down (I need the exercise) and finally play on the keys. That should do it! 🙂 Take a minute to take the poll so I can see how you feel about this.

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
YOUTUBE
Pinterest
Pinterest
INSTAGRAM

2 thoughts to “We Wish You a Merry Christmas Pre-reading version

  • sheryl gunno

    Young students are good at learning word rhythm so it can be taught as a speech piece tapping the rhythm of the words. Students can then say the words and tap the rhythm on a closed piano lid using the correct hand. Then head to the piano when they can tap the rhythm. Also, use of the Kodaly ta and ti-ti are useful with young children. Even if the eighth notes haven’t been formally introduced they are getting a fun experience that is preparing them to be more successful when they are introduced.

    Reply
  • Celia

    I’ve found it kind of depends on the student. I have a couple pre-readers who play really well by ear and can pick things up by rote. I also have some who can’t do that for the life of them.

    Reply

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: